07 Aug, 2009, Terraco wrote in the 1st comment:
Votes: 0
is there a place to get the instruction for running gdb? I looked it up and couldnt find anything. I am asking cause I am getting a segmentation fault and need to run it.

thanx in advance
07 Aug, 2009, David Haley wrote in the 2nd comment:
Votes: 0
Nick Gammon has a very good guide to using gdb.
07 Aug, 2009, Terraco wrote in the 3rd comment:
Votes: 0
Thank you very much David Haley for the link.
07 Aug, 2009, Terraco wrote in the 4th comment:
Votes: 0
There is something called a Segmatation fault in my nohup.out file what is that?
more nohup.out
Segmentation fault
Segmentation fault
Segmentation fault
Segmentation fault
Segmentation fault
Segmentation fault
Segmentation fault
Segmentation fault
Segmentation fault
Segmentation fault
Segmentation fault
Segmentation fault
Segmentation fault
Segmentation fault
Segmentation fault
Segmentation fault
Segmentation fault
07 Aug, 2009, Koron wrote in the 5th comment:
Votes: 0
That's pretty much the generic "omfg I'm broken, help me!" message your mud will spit out.
07 Aug, 2009, Kline wrote in the 6th comment:
Votes: 0
Segfaults (usually) will produce a core dump if you're compiled with debugging (you probably did) and your system allows it. Following Nick's guide you can then use gdb to examine the core dump against your game's executable file and figure out what broke and where.
07 Aug, 2009, David Haley wrote in the 7th comment:
Votes: 0
Alternatively, you can start the program in gdb directly (as Nick's guide shows) and examine the crash "as it happens". (I prefer to do this when possible.)
07 Aug, 2009, Runter wrote in the 8th comment:
Votes: 0
Terraco said:
There is something called a Segmatation fault in my nohup.out file what is that?
more nohup.out
Segmentation fault
Segmentation fault
[snip]


In an Unix-like environment, a process that accesses an invalid memory address receives the SIGSEGV signal. If you're dealing with windows, a process that accesses invalid memory receives the STATUS_ACCESS_VIOLATION exception.

To answer your would-be question segmentation is an approach to memory protection in operating systems. Even though now paging has supersede it for most purposes much of the terminology has remained the same. Ergo "segmentation fault" is a fault(error) in your memory protection scheme. This will occur, as indicated above, when memory is accessed that does not belong to the program in question. (Or is just invalid.) This, frankly, is a much better alternative to crashing/corrupting another legitimate program because of a rogue pointer.
07 Aug, 2009, David Haley wrote in the 9th comment:
Votes: 0
It's also raised when trying to perform an operation that you are not allowed to, such as trying to write to read-only segments/pages (e.g., the code segment).
08 Aug, 2009, Terraco wrote in the 10th comment:
Votes: 0
Quote
Like I said, you are confusing the lack of symptoms with the lack of underlying problems. A clean compile hardly means that there are no problems; I can write innumerable programs that compile cleanly yet crash. Still, if this works for you, then so be it; just don't think that you've solved the underlying problem. It might come back to bite you later on, and it will be all the harder to debug as you will have masked the symptoms you knew about.

To quote David Haley from the cedit post and the check, I think I know what your talking about there since I cant find the error in my ROM and I really don't understand the gdb thing in all honesty, to it reads like an dead old roman language. my game doesn't have much of a coder just someone who comes in and looks over everything and adds something then goes. Anyways what it does is resets mudschool 6 times then crashes the mud
08 Aug, 2009, Koron wrote in the 11th comment:
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Fortunately, many of us understand the gdb language. You've always got the option of pasting your backtrace and asking for help.
08 Aug, 2009, Runter wrote in the 12th comment:
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Lol. Gdb isn't that bad. If it's really that unreadable it probably means you're doing something wrong.
08 Aug, 2009, Terraco wrote in the 13th comment:
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I found the error and fixed it, I didn't mean the command was unreadable. Sorry for the mis-communication there. The site listed above reads to me like the "dead roman language" LOL
09 Aug, 2009, David Haley wrote in the 14th comment:
Votes: 0
You will need to understand at least some of gdb eventually. If there were parts of the guide that gave you trouble, I would suggest asking here or at Nick's forums; people can help you out.
22 Aug, 2009, JohnnyStarr wrote in the 15th comment:
Votes: 0
BTW, just in case you want more than the typical gdb, you might want to check out cgdb
Coming from a Windows background, for me it's got much more of an IDE feel. The source window functions very similar to Vim.
Anyway, I thought it was nifty.
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